This week:

3 – Shareholder value takes priority over our security

2 – Clouds need to be secured too.

1 – As they walk out the door, turn off their access.

 


 

3 – Shareholder value takes priority over our security

“Microsoft chose to ignore a critical flaw, prioritizing profit over security, leaving the U.S. government vulnerable to one of the largest cyberattacks in history.”

Summary:

A ProPublica investigation reveals that Microsoft ignored warnings about a security flaw in its software, which was later exploited by Russian hackers during the SolarWinds cyberattack. The flaw allowed attackers to access sensitive government data, including the US Nuclear Security Administration’s information. Apparently, people are not incentivised to focus on security: “You will get a promotion because you released the next new shiny thing [..] You are not going to get a promotion because you fixed a bunch of security bugs.”

So what?

Microsoft’s prioritisation of shareholder value over security continues to disappoint. And despite their promises to do better, I wonder how much money Microsoft and other “Too Big To Care” technology firms are investing in lobbying to ensure new laws don’t force a change in that prioritisation.

Source: ProPublica (and recently mentioned by Secure The Village)


 

2 – Clouds need to be secured too

“For years, SaaS [e.g. Microsoft 365, SalesForce, Google Workspace] security has been an afterthought. However, the landscape depicted in this year’s survey paints a dramatically different picture, one where SaaS security has surged to the forefront of corporate agendas.”

Summary:

A recently-published report reveals a significant increase in investment and prioritisation of SaaS security among enterprises. Many organisations expanded their SaaS security teams and improved their security capabilities, but it continues to be difficult to identify the most concerning security gaps. Anyone who has tried to navigate Microsoft 365’s Security Score recommendations will know exactly what I mean!

So what?

SaaS services providers like Microsoft and Google may be responsible for securing some of the doorways to the data you store in the cloud, but you’re still responsible for securing a lot of them.

Source: The Hacker News


 

1 – As they walk out the door, turn off their access

“Failing to [implement] basic protective measures can and has led to catastrophic attacks that cost companies significant amounts of money.”

Summary:

A former IT employee at an IT firm in Singapore was sentenced to 2.5 years in prison for deleting 180 virtual servers – He caused the damage out of spite after being fired. His actions led to $678,000 in damages. The case also exposed the company’s lax security in managing ex-employee access.

So what?

The basics are still important: When someone leaves the organisation (especially against their will), make sure their access is removed as soon as possible. Malicious outsiders aren’t the only people we need to worry about.

Source: Bleeping Computer